Tagged: digital humanities

Cultural Galaxies: Linked Open Data in Museums

Our project considered the benefits and innovation linked open data has on museum collections. We reviewed how lod structures can be used to leverage and unite museum collections by examining how lod works, what museum projects utilize lod, and future possibilities.

Crowdsourcing in GLAMs

What is crowdsourcing and how does it apply to GLAMs (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums)? This poster explores the definition of crowdsourcing in cultural heritage institutions and the advantages and disadvantages of using crowdsourcing in these contexts.

Artists’ Books: A Dynamic Atlas

The project is a mock IMLS Grant Proposal for “Artists’ Books: A Dynamic Atlas.” This pilot project will use linked open data to create a dynamic mapping interface that indicates the home libraries of artists’ books located within New York. Led by the MoMA Library in partnership with the Frick Collection, Brooklyn Museum, Whitney Museum, and Metropolitan Museum, the dynamic atlas will deepen engagement with these unique collections; allow users to visualize connections between artists, books, and institutions; and make project data available for use on the open web.

“Fake News”: A Rhetorical Analysis

This project analyzes the circulation of the term “fake news” as a rhetorical device, used to make political assertions about the truth of various stories and sources. These sources range from longstanding and popular news outlets to more recent news websites and social media. Across these sources, we examine the use and users of the term “fake news”, its frequency of use, and the sources and topics that are described as “fake news”.

Women Behind the Page and On the Page in Comics: No Longer in Refrigerators?

By using web-scraping tools, I obtained data from fan-curated wikia pages concerning several comic book publishers. By assessing this data at several different points from 1995-2015, I sought to see if the proportion of women writers and artists in the comic book industry was increasing, if women artists and writers tend to more often work on female-fronted titles, and if that changes based on if the title is creator-owned or work-for-hire.

Day of DH: A Textual Analysis

This project examines definitions of digital humanities that were collected at the Day of DH conferences between 2009-2014, in order to identify themes and trends in the way the field has been defined over these years.

Data Sousveillance: An Analysis of Cultural and Congressional Surveillance Rhetoric over Time

This study aims to shed light on conversations of surveillance over the past 40 years of American discourse, using a corpus of Congressional records, mainstream and independent news sources, movie scrips and reviews, and archival materials. By comparing general and specific sentiment measurement across these various sources, we examine points of similarity and difference in attitude across the present and past, cultural and countercultural, institutional and popular with regard to surveillance—watching surveillance, as it were, through assemblages of text and data.

From Data Collection to Prototype to Interactive Tool: Adding a Gender View to the Linked Jazz Visualization

In an earlier blogpost, I discussed my work with Linked Jazz to enrich the Linked Jazz dataset of names with a gender attribute through automated means by querying linked data resources. The main section of that blogpost described visualizing the results of the work using Gephi. This blogpost describes the methods used to translate the Gephi prototype into a new gender view that can be easily integrated with the existing Linked Jazz platform.

Linked Jazz - Tulane viz

Expanding the Linked Jazz Universe

Highlighting contributions to the Linked Jazz project, including the creation of linked data from historical photo metadata and, more recently, performance history data from Carnegie Hall and online jazz discographies.